“I carry my songbooks everywhere I go. My inspiration kind of comes everywhere.” Sophomore Luna Brosamer always has an emergency journal tucked into her backpack for when inspiration strikes.

At home, surrounded by faded photographs and dangling green vines, she sings about the angst and joy of being a teenager in songs dedicated to her loved ones. At school, Luna radiates the vibes of an autumnal folk singer, with tinged auburn hair, matching orange hoop earrings, and a dark red sweater for the day. 

Her entire life has been spent surrounded by music, with her parents regularly singing at cafes. “We’re all about music. My family even jokes that you’re not a Brosamer if you don’t play an instrument or sing,” she said. “My family influences my music the most, 1000%.”

While she began to write songs in third grade and chord progressions in fourth, it wasn’t until seventh grade that she decided she wanted to be a singer. Always striving to make honest music, Luna pours her heart into her songs. “When I write music, it hits really hard. It’s therapy. So when I’m writing, I’m really thinking, ‘Is this actually true to myself?’” 

Still, like many young artists, Luna originally had doubts about recording her own music. “Something I really struggle with is the technical aspects of music. Producing songs makes absolutely no sense,” she said. However, with the encouragement of the people around her, especially her musically inclined friend Ella, she now expects to produce music within the next year. She said, “Ella started telling me that we should work together, which fueled that passion for music-making that I didn’t think was possible before.” 

Her old and new inspirations are mirrored by her playlists, overflowing with delicate indie and folk artists, like Bon Iver, Cavetown, The Head and the Heart, and Frankie Cosmos. However, she also admires more emotive artists such as Sir Chloe, Roar, beabadoobee, and Soccer Mommy. She said, “Most of the music I’ve been recording is in the indie-rock style, but a part of my music will always be rooted in soft guitar and folk style because that’s what my parents play.”  

However, Luna’s sound is constantly developing. She said, “It’s been exciting to depart from simpler tunes, because my music has shifted from only sad, emotional songs to being able to write really happy and fun songs that are more my vibe.” 

Besides her journal, Luna also uses social media as an honest outlet for her music, where she regularly posts videos with her raw vocals accompanied only by her acoustic guitar. “I know a lot of people have really negative experiences on social media. For me, though, if anything, posting more about music actually helps that relationship,” she said, “because I can post something and feel good about it. Even if I get two comments or a thumbs up, it still makes me happy knowing that people can have it if they want to look at it.”

Above all, she hopes to follow in the footsteps of her musical family. “I’m making them proud by doing what I love and staying true to myself to fulfill that musical part of me.” 

You can find Luna on campus, at open mics at various shops around the Bay Area, or by listening to her songs on Instagram  @luflannerymusic or @lunabosamer.  

She remains one of the more relaxed people entering the music industry, rooted to the calming sounds of folk music. “I’m just enjoying the serenity of it right now, and just flowing with what’s going on and not stressing about it or making it a job. I’m feeling free and accepting the music that I make for myself.”

Sonia Freedman is a junior in her second year of M-A Journalism. She began "The Music Moment" column and is looking forward to continuing to write about the culture, community, and unique events at M-A. In her free time, you can find her editing Spotify playlists, extending her Duolingo streak, or formulating the best salad. You can also find her work on the blog for jwa.org!

Leave a Reply